Travel blog: Panama Canal

early morning we wake to find ourselves waiting in Gatun Lake. Passengers on shore excursions are gone by 8.30 and will rejoin the ship on the Pacific side. It’s a sparkly day, clear skies and tropical colours. Canadian made tugs shepherd us to and from the locks. Red channel markers lead the way …

Our large ships just fits the lock. There is a windsock and “mules” on the rails, guide us through: see yellow bumpers. Buildings painted blue and white. Now owned by Chinese, I last passed through under American ownership.

travel journal

Costa Maya. My sketchbook seduced me with its smooth white pages, colour and size … but too much water warped the pages. Regardless, here are the drawings as they capture the jewel colours and the wonderful light following two dull cloudy days.

And that’s what journaling is really all about.

Costa Maya is a small tourist region in the municipality of Othón P. Blanco in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico, with the Caribbean Sea to its east. We stayed on board, relaxing in the quiet of the ship.

Random UK drawings

Travel journals can record historic places, overnight stays and driving routes; they can also hold memories of personal significance, instantly recalling quiet moments.

My cousin once lived in a house/trailer in a beautifully designed park setting called West Moors. Owned by the original farmers who developed their land, it was a friendly, well tended place and this was the view from her front windows. In time, the place was sold and the new owner dropped new places into every available spot. Luckily, by then my cousin was going blind so could not see the new surrounding. I remember this sketch with pleasure.
quirky details are often caught by my pen … a cottage with enormous chimneys, the way an arch is formed is formed from selected large stones, the walls filled with smaller pebbles
Red brick detail creating a simple harmonious design with pebble walls, thatch roof with straw birds sculpted in, and simple scallop shapes in wood providing simple detail. And not forgetting the Celtic magic of slow growing and long lasting yew trees.

Lacock Abbey, Wilts UK

Lacock Abbey in the village of Lacock, Wiltshire, England, was founded in 1232 by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. It has fine medieval cloisters, sacristy, chapter house and monastic rooms of the Abbey, which have survived. Today the property is owned by the National Trust and open to the public. Website: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/lacock-abbey-fox-talbot-museum-and-village

Stable yard @ Lacock Abbey, showing brewery on right

This drive was in October, when the hedgerows were being trimmed. Driving through leafy tunnels where the shimmering light created a pointilism effect among the darkly silhouetted branches. There was twittering birdsong whenever we stopped.

Blog: Beginnings

My book: “Carved in Oak -drawings of  medieval pew carvings in English churches” – began my study of medieval designs in UK and Europe in 2010.  For many years, I had devoted my art to raising awareness about built heritage in Vancouver BC,  a city I have loved ever since moving here from South America.

While at high school in Ottawa, ON I first thought of becoming a painter,  starting studies in Lima, Peru  where pens and paintbrushes immediately made my thoughts tangible. 

detail: Chatter

In 2001 I moved to the Okanagan valley, winning an award from the City of Kelowna for my submission to their call for am image of their emblem flower: the arrow leaf plant.

From 2006, I spent part of my time in England, where I had earned my art degree,  drawing  medieval pew ends. This led into my  work on birds and leaves.   …     read more at:                                          https://joscottb.com                                                                           Jo Scott-B December 2018