Random UK drawings

Travel journals can record historic places, overnight stays and driving routes; they can also hold memories of personal significance, instantly recalling quiet moments.

My cousin once lived in a house/trailer in a beautifully designed park setting called West Moors. Owned by the original farmers who developed their land, it was a friendly, well tended place and this was the view from her front windows. In time, the place was sold and the new owner dropped new places into every available spot. Luckily, by then my cousin was going blind so could not see the new surrounding. I remember this sketch with pleasure.
quirky details are often caught by my pen … a cottage with enormous chimneys, the way an arch is formed is formed from selected large stones, the walls filled with smaller pebbles
Red brick detail creating a simple harmonious design with pebble walls, thatch roof with straw birds sculpted in, and simple scallop shapes in wood providing simple detail. And not forgetting the Celtic magic of slow growing and long lasting yew trees.

travel journals: cruising

Although I am not drawn to cruising, as a teenager in South America, I often travelled, with my father, on cargo ships as he was a Lloyd’s surveyor. So when a friend asked me to go on a short cruise, I was happy to help someone who really wanted to see the Panama Canal.

We sailed from Galveston, Texas and I couldn’t resist sketching the oil rig as it was my first time seeing one up close. (Our cabin was on the opposite of the ship from the dock)

Lacock Abbey, Wilts UK

Lacock Abbey in the village of Lacock, Wiltshire, England, was founded in 1232 by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, as a nunnery of the Augustinian order. It has fine medieval cloisters, sacristy, chapter house and monastic rooms of the Abbey, which have survived. Today the property is owned by the National Trust and open to the public. Website: https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/lacock-abbey-fox-talbot-museum-and-village

Stable yard @ Lacock Abbey, showing brewery on right

This drive was in October, when the hedgerows were being trimmed. Driving through leafy tunnels where the shimmering light created a pointilism effect among the darkly silhouetted branches. There was twittering birdsong whenever we stopped.

Cotswolds … Uk journal continued

Travelling back to England, we are in the magical colours of the Cotswolds, with their golden ochre stone building.

Walking, pub lunches and reading history books – buildings well photographed by others so I was otherwise entertained here

Best web page for an overview of this area is https://www.cotswolds.info

Visiting Wales

Sage green and violet grown in this landscape. My brother lived in Abergavenny. The A465 road runs from Abergavenny to the Neath. The section westwards from Abergavenny is more commonly known as the Heads of the Valleys Road because it joins together the northern heads of the South Wales Valleys. Here the lunar-like landscape is dotted with sheep; scratch the surface to find black dust and rock. Sheep once had their tails docked but longer tails allow them to dispell flies … as nature intended.

Tumpa in Welsh is a waterfall. Tumpa is also the high point in the Brecon Hills. Despite the gloomy weather, the clouds lifted to give a view across the hill.

In Wales UK

In Wales LLan means place so often features in names like Llanthony, layered with history in thr Black Mountains of Wales. I heard Romans for three reasons: wild dogs, women and grain (exporting 700 tons per annum)

I remember the depressing dark slag heaps in Wales, especially on rainy days like this.
Now slag heaps are overgrown with green grass.
It rained steadily all day but we walked anyway
Our hotel was once the Bishop’s residence –we slept in a room in the tower.