Moving Along

adjusting the drawing – proteas are like a hand (wrist to wrist)/holding the middle – this has started to sprawl: well nested but warped

Once a painting is born there’s no way to rush it; I paint consistently, addressing problems, maintaining the rhythm. Music helps me start every session. Thinking time is my investment; especially as I underpaint in contrasting colours, meanwhile tweaking the drawing. Though I start with a clear idea, once it’s on the canvas, parts needs adjusting … and changes will continue to happen right up to the end. I rough in the underpainting, creating a chaos that challenges me to continue. Sometimes I’ve given up by now if it’s not coming alive. This painting has passed the test and I am building layers towards a finished result, covering the cannvas in colours add a subtle vibrancy.

emerging from chaos

starting a 48″x36″ canvas

PROTEAS

-apologies. This post was taken down to edit errors and is simply re-posted- I’m fine with paint … not computers – Jo

drying protea leaves and a messy table as colours begin

 studio notes

Watching paint dry has me working on two or three canvases … after several months of tweaking, changes and more changes, I can say “finished” to a piece started a year ago, and varnish it to send it to my next exhibition. Now I’m gazing at shadows thrown by protea leaves, which are twisting as they dry. The protea painting is off to a strong start as it takes on a new life, already diverging from my original concept. I liken it to writing, the when characters take on a life of their own.

I hate styrofoam (see photo) but free range eggs occasionally arrive it, purposely re-cycled … it makes a great paint holder, easy to pop into a plastic bag (another hate!) – I mix on glass palette; the mini one pictured above (I have three). I try to keep my palette clean as I work but occasionally one dries “dirty”. Hand sanitiser cleans dried acrylics like magic, then that palette is well washed and put away for several days.

background grass detail for proteas

 

starting a canvas

upcomng exhibition

Feather & Flora- March 1st – April 10th 2019

Van Dusen Botanical Gardens, 5251 Oak St. Vancouver BC

With the date for a new exhibition set, I am gathering the pieces I want to feature along with my medieval and earlier birds, most of which are small images (8”x10” – 10”x14”.  By medieval, I mean to my pieces, inspired by my research in museums and libraries.

A new piece requires moving it from rumination to reality. This piece started last September, when I visited Kew Gardens and again was fascinated by proteas. Intense study often means looking, then drawing then painting. Between initial looking and eventual painting, some pieces lose their passion and may never become a final painting.

I know it will happen when the piece takes on a life of its own, immediately morphing into something other than initially imagined.

This blog will take you through the process ….. though perhaps earlier than the posts go up, it will be at the same pace.


Blog: Beginnings

My book: “Carved in Oak -drawings of  medieval pew carvings in English churches” – began my study of medieval designs in UK and Europe in 2010.  For many years, I had devoted my art to raising awareness about built heritage in Vancouver BC,  a city I have loved ever since moving here from South America.

While at high school in Ottawa, ON I first thought of becoming a painter,  starting studies in Lima, Peru  where pens and paintbrushes immediately made my thoughts tangible. 

detail: Chatter

In 2001 I moved to the Okanagan valley, winning an award from the City of Kelowna for my submission to their call for am image of their emblem flower: the arrow leaf plant.

From 2006, I spent part of my time in England, where I had earned my art degree,  drawing  medieval pew ends. This led into my  work on birds and leaves.   …     read more at:                                          https://joscottb.com                                                                           Jo Scott-B December 2018